Category Archives: young people

L. ROOTS: The Story of 19 Year Old Entrepreneur Linda Kratzer

L. Roots

Linda, it has been five years since you spoke at my book presentation. You were a great example of the teen inspired growth model, the EPIC Model. Now you’re 19. I’d like to revisit your story and your business L. ROOTS as you continue to explore, play, inspire, and connect. Can you please tell the readers who don’t know you who you are and what is going on in your life at this time?

Sure, my name is Linda Kratzer and I’m the proud owner of L. ROOTS. I live in South Styria and since the age of 12, I have been producing and selling my own natural products. I love to create new products and tweak existing ones. In addition to cosmetic products like soap, balms, or aroma roll-ons, I also have tasty and delicious creations to savor. I offer a wide variety of syrups, herbal salt, and jellies.

As long as I can remember I have always been interested in herbs and the way they heal, affect, and help the human body. I continuously attend seminars and trainings to increase my knowledge about the herbs I use. The most recent and recognizable one was my aromatherapy diploma. I’m currently studying Pharmaceutical Studies at Karl Franzens University in Graz. After finishing my studies I plan on further growing my business.

Now with the EPIC Model in mind, let’s start with Explore. What have you been learning? What new business ideas have you had?

I think the learning process was by far the most important over the last years. Due to the many seminars and courses I’ve attended, I’m better able to perfect my products. Step by step, I’m improving the formulas for my soaps, specific biological cosmetics, and other recipes and learning about the business. This is a demanding process and one not that easy to master. I’m still young and because I didn’t have anyone to tell me about these things I had to learn a lot on my own. But now I have a certificate to commercially manufacture cosmetics.

The certification in aromatherapy was a year of hard work, but I am happy that I did it. I kind of rose like a phoenix (as my training supervisor said) because I learned so many important things and skills for my future. The lessons were multifaceted. I learned about marketing, behavior at business meetings, the biochemical background of herbs, how to deal with clients, various contraindications, diseases and how they occur, human anatomy, and last but not least how to create aromatherapy with essential oils. But most importantly, I want to use my knowledge about essential oils to create unique high-quality cosmetics.

L. ROOTSDuring this extensive education, I also found out where I wanted to go with L. ROOTS and what I want to do with this knowledge in the future. I have become interested in human anatomy and may want to learn more about it and become a massage therapist as well. I could use personalized massage oils for my clients. As part of my current studies, I am close to finishing a certification called “Aromastreichungen”. It isn’t massage therapy per se, but it does involve applying oils to the body.

Next is Play which is about actual experimentation. Learning by doing. What new discoveries have you made?

I can proudly say that I use essential oils for most aches and pains in everyday life, not just for physical but also for psychological matters. I’m a quite cerebral person so I use the oils to learn to listen to the heart as well. I learned that things take time and that I sometimes should just relax a little. All this became possible because of different essential oil mixtures. As a result of my experimentation or “playing,” I Iearned that you can trick your body in positive ways.

I recently had a medical issue that also has unexpectedly resulted in play. A few months ago I had a thyroid operation that left a scar. As a result of this personal experience, I’m developing a scar ointment. Since this medical event, I am also “playing” with essential oils that support the hormonal system. It has been working amazingly well!

As an aromatherapist, I make recommendations based on a person’s ailments. Since I don’t recommend anything I didn’t try out myself, I’m always busy experimenting on myself and on my whole family. They don’t mind. I want to know how easy the application is, how the people like it, how they feel, and of course, if it works in fulfilling the desired purpose.

In 2019 I was chosen by the Landeshypothekenbank Steiermark as one of the manufacturers for their presents for International Savings Day. I had to produce thousands of my rose jelly, a quantity I’ve never done to such an extent before. But I did it and I was proud! I creatively made a concept for storage without an actual working space. It was a valuable “learning by doing” on how to work timely and effectively to maintain high product quality in large quantities.

Now let’s move on to Inspire. Who has been inspirational in motivating you to start your business and further push boundaries as both you and L. ROOTS evolve?

In general, I’d say I always loved my work so much that it became clear over the years that I’d never want to do anything else. I just want to get up every day and keep developing my business, create new products, and learn about nature and essential oils. Some friends are supportive, but I’d say most important for me in starting my business were my parents. They always believe in me even when I have doubts. They encourage me to try things out. My work needs a lot of space and time and they continue to support the development of L. ROOTS. They even paid for some courses. I also always consider their opinion when there are big decisions to make because their point of view means a lot to me.

My boyfriend, Benedikt, is also one of my greatest sources of inspiration. We are very similar but in different ways. He too is a young entrepreneur and started his business Remagine, doing web development since the age of 20. We go to business meetings together and encourage each other to push boundaries. We both are still young and sometimes it’s hard to be taken seriously by older people who have had their business their whole life but together we are braver. He also made my website. Thanks to him I can now sell my products online as well.

L. ROOTS Do I think I inspire others? I’m not really a self-confident person so I haven’t thought about that before. I’m sure some people might feel inspired by my work. I have raised awareness about nature among children already and I think one could call this inspirational. But what I can claim is, that some teenagers my age might be inspired to start their own business. All it needs is discipline and passion. Sometimes you have to work weekends but if you love what you do you will not have any problems working hard for your success.

Last but not least in the EPIC Model is Connect. What have you learned about yourself in the last five years?  What new connections with others have contributed to your development? Finally, I believe younger generations are developing a closer connection with nature. This is particularly true given your business. What new connections with nature you have made since your journey started with L. ROOTS?

I have been learning a lot about myself. Sometimes it even seems as if I just got to know me in the last 5 years! I noticed that I have a knack for understanding human nature. I like working with people. Surprisingly, I also like office work which I’d have never expected about myself. I learned about my strengths and some of my weaknesses. Delegating work is an issue because I have problems with accepting some help. I also didn’t feel comfortable about being the youngest person attending courses. It did take some time for me to open up and to make friends but now I know being the youngest isn’t something I have to overthink. Age doesn’t matter, because people who want to learn something specific are always connected by their interest and not by their age.

In the last 5 years, I got to know so many important and inspiring people who helped me grow. That’s a fact I appreciate a lot. I think each person who comes into your life is there for a reason. All in all, I wouldn’t be where I am today if I hadn’t met all those people. They helped me, for example, with my first photoshoot. I now have a room to practice aromatherapy in a practice at Haus voller Leben in Leibnitz. There have also been opportunities to sell my products in shops and local businesses.

My new connection with nature is now I know the biochemical makeup of medicinal plants. It’s always been interesting to know that hundreds of years ago our ancestors had tremendous knowledge about plants. They were “learning by doing” and passed their knowledge down over generations. Nowadays those discoveries are well-founded and we can learn about it.

Some people reading this may have teens with whom they can share your story. Since beginning L. ROOTS as a pre-teen, what tips would you give a young person passionate about starting her or his own business?

I think they should know on the one hand, that starting a business is hard work. It’s a long process with lots of trials and errors. They should write their plans down and see what they are talented at but also where their weaknesses are. But let’s not call it “weaknesses”. I prefer to call it “things you can work on”. For example, I have to work on being confident in front of many people so I plan to attend some courses to improve my self-confidence.

But on the other hand, I would like to highlight how truly beautiful it is to wake up in the morning and know you can live your dream. All your hard work is really worth it and it pays off. On days when all seems to stagnate, just try to write down what you have already achieved in life. Write down your accomplishments and what you are proud of. It also helps to visualize your success. And most important for starting a business at a young age is to stop overthinking what others might think about you.

Also worth mentioning is that you should be aware that you are the architect of your own fortune. So, to achieve something you have to go out, talk to people, and do something for it even if it’s hard sometimes or if you have to push your boundaries for it. You are what you do, not what you say you will do or what you wish for.

You can do this! 😉

Linda, is there anything else you would like to share with the readers?

First I’d like to share that we need to work WITH nature and not AGAINST nature. We benefit from plants when they are used as essential oils and when making tea from the leaves of medicinal herbs).

Second, for whoever needs to hear this: You can start your own business if you want to. I’m only 19 and on my way to living my dream. Anyone can do this.

Third, good things take time. You can do your best but you also have to let it grow by itself a little. So you do have time to think and in the meantime, some opportunities can unfold by themselves. Be patient. Sometimes that’s the hardest part for me.

And last but not least, surround yourself with people who help you grow. Appreciate the ones who have always been there for you when you needed them most.

Thanks Linda. As a final question, are there particular people or businesses you seek or feel could be a good cooperation partner as you grow L.Roots? And what is the best way to get in touch with you?

Well, I’d say I’m looking for cooperation in the following five areas.

  • I’m looking for partner shops to sell my products. Listed on my website are already some companies doing so. This really helps me get established.
  • I’m interested in market places where I can exhibit products.
  • For next year I’d be interested in organizations offering workshops for children and young adults.
  • I’m open to cooperating with psychologists who would like to integrate mixtures of essential oils in their work or seek doctors who are interested in alternative medicine.
  • What I’m looking for most lately is a place to work. My business is growing and our kitchen as a workspace and my own room as an office is no longer the right place. Maybe there are people who had the same problem and who have ideas or know of places in the area from Graz to Leibnitz that would be suitable for the growing needs of my business.

I’m always pleased to get tips. I’m easy to reach, although, as a student, I may not always answer right away. I always return calls. You can also write on my website contact form on www.lroots.at, or send me an e-mail at info@lroots.at. If you want to know more about my products you can find me on Instagram (l.roots.info), Facebook (L.Roots by Linda Kratzer), Pinterest (l.roots), and LinkedIn (Linda Kratzer).

Thank you Linda for this exciting and inspiring update. It is truly EPIC! For my German readers, Linda Kratzer will be an upcoming guest on Julia Oswald’s Lunch Break Stories. Stay tuned!
About the author

Jean-Pierre Kallanian is a Human Systems Expert, Conflict Resolution Specialist, Process Facilitator, Youth Advocate, Author, and Speaker. He accompanies individuals, teams, and organizations wanting to fully integrate their human potential. As the creator of the EPIC Model, Jean-Pierre brings out the expertise in groups by encouraging authenticity, intention, and collective wisdom.

VUCA: from a system and problem focus to a person and solution orientation

VUCA

VUCA needs a new meaning and focus

By now VUCA is as familiar of an acronym as ADHD, AWOL, and of course COVID.  Acronyms are useful in labeling and giving importance to complex themes. Labeling a problem soothes the mind by identifying something hard to understand. The hope is then to find a solution. What if the solution were in the acronym? What if the problem-focused and system-oriented VUCA acronym became solution-focused and people-oriented? The angst derived by the former would diminish and the optimism derived by the latter would flourish. People solve problems and influence systems. So wouldn’t it be wise to promote solution-orientated attitudes and behaviors?

VUCA people transform VUCA situations

What do adolescents, first-time parents, adults in a mid-life crisis, or anyone facing a life-altering event tell you? Life is VUCA. Digitalization and globalization may be intensifying VUCA, but it isn’t anything new. What if instead of associating VUCA as a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous world to dread, it was linked to Virtuousness, Understanding, Compassion, and Adaptability? Instead of being at the whim of a VUCA world, these essential human skills foster life-long learning. What effect would this reframing of VUCA and consequent skill acquisition have on our human development?

Virtuousness contains volatility

The online Cambridge Dictionary defines virtuous as “having good moral qualities and behaviors.” Fears have a tendency to rise in volatile situations. Drastic fluctuations, therefore, influence people to act impulsively with short-term results and immediate gains. A selfish mentality can develop. “Take what you can now before it is too late!” This perturbed mindset can lead to rash and immoral reactions. The accumulation of unethical decision making on a large scale in times of volatility ironically increases and compounds the volatility one wishes to diminish. A strong moral compass helps contain volatility. Virtuous people are stabilizers in times of instability.

Understanding reduces uncertainty

The online Cambridge Dictionary defines understanding as “knowledge about a subject, situation, etc. or about how something works.” How should one deal with uncertainty? Be mindful of what is in your control/what is known. Seek guidance to understand that which is uncertain or not completely known. Educate yourself. Ask questions. Conduct your own research. Simply put, be curious and learn. There is nothing more conducive to festering uncertainty than a fixed mindset, or solely relying on hearsay or one source of information. Fear of the unknown is best dealt with by keeping an open mind and understanding other realities.

Compassion humanizes complexity

The online Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines compassion as the “sympathetic consciousness of others’ distress together with a desire to alleviate it.”  With nearly 8 billion people navigating complexity each day no one is exempt and no one goes unscathed. Unchecked complexity can lead to victimization and potential harm. Therefore, we need to show our compassion. Compassion humanizes the negative consequences of unresolved complexity by fostering inclusivity, a helping attitude, and raising social awareness at all levels. The pervasive, inclusive, and multi-leveled effort of the current Black Lives Matter movement is a case in point. Compassion ensures that we acknowledge how complexity impacts us all. And as importantly, it illustrates the vital role we all play in dealing with it.

Adaptability neutralizes ambiguity

The online Oxford Dictionary defines adaptability as the “quality of being able to change or be changed in order to deal successfully with new situations.” As creatures of habit, we adopt routines to creatively deal with ambiguity. Being too reliant on a fixed routine or way of living, however, can have limitations when an unforeseen significant event occurs. COVID-19 has been disrupting the routines and habits of millions of people. The further our fixed mindsets stray away from an ever-changing world reality the more we are confronted with this widening gap. This is illustrated in the digital paradox.  Unfortunately, it takes a global pandemic like COVID-19 to remind us that we are not masters of the universe. Rather, we are a part of it. And as such, we, like all other living organisms, must either adapt to changing circumstances or face unnecessary hardship.

VUCA people need to be nurtured and engaged

It is high time we better deal with volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity. Fortunately, with a change of perspective and focus, the answer may be hidden in the same acronym. With virtuousness, understanding, compassion, and adaptability one is better able to cope with VUCA situations. All humans have the capacity to develop and practice these life-long skills. Doing so feeds a growth mindset and cultivates a collective consciousness focused on posterity. Younger generations see the value and need of being VUCA. We are seeing more VUCA people organizing in greater numbers across continents and for causes affecting all humans everywhere. Progressive companies also reap the benefit of developing human edge cultures. In sum, VUCA people are essential for a VUCA world.

About the author

Jean-Pierre Kallanian is a Human Systems Expert, Conflict Resolution Specialist, Process Facilitator, Youth Advocate, Author, and Speaker. He accompanies individuals, teams, and organizations wanting to fully integrate their human potential. As the creator of the EPIC Model, Jean-Pierre brings out the expertise in groups by encouraging authenticity, intention, and collective wisdom.

Effective Leadership – A changing of the guards

Effective Leadership

What is effective leadership anyway?

The Online Oxford Dictionary defines leadership as the action of leading a group of people or an organization. Additionally, it defines effective as successful in producing a desired or intended result.” Simply put: Effective leadership is the capacity to successfully guide the intended or desired action(s) of a person or group. According to this amoral definition, any person or group of people versed in rhetoric and/or subversive tactics can display effective leadership. But we know this not to be true. Ethical intention and the means by which outcomes are achieved are paramount. 

Essential components of effective leadership

Organizations seeking effective leadership must look beyond outcome achievement. As the current global reality demonstrates, the ends no longer justify the means. Personal integrity, social competencies, economic equity, conflict transformation, transparency, environmental stewardship, posterity, ethical conduct, and inclusivity (age, gender, race) need to be at the core of effective leadership requirements and competencies. First, companies must clarify the intention of effective leadership. Second, this raison d’être should elicit an authentic response in every individual inspired to heed the call. Lastly, leadership needs to have the capacity to skillfully and creatively orchestrate the collection, the aggregate of these diverse individual entities in order to bring the intention to fruition. How should leadership ethically and equitably influence your organization? What sustainable methods should leadership use to reach objectives? How inclusive should processes be? How should leadership ensure that all stakeholders benefit from the outcome?

Effective leadership ensures economic equity 

According to the Credit Suisse Global Wealth Report, the world’s richest 1 percent, own 44 percent of the world’s wealth. Adults with less than $10,000 in wealth make up 56.6 percent of the world’s population, but hold less than 2 percent of global wealth. Effective leadership needs to become financially transparent, sustainable, and equitable for posterity’s sake. Universal economic opportunity needs to be at the forefront of all policies. Leadership needs to ensure that all humans have fair and equal access to both natural and artificial resources necessary to sustain a proper standard for living (access mental and physical healthcare included) and provide for a family when desired without jeopardizing career development.

Effective leadership is inclusive

The most translated document in the world is the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights. To date, it has been translated in 370 languages. Why? In addition to preserving the environment, without which humans could not exist, there is nothing more fundamental than ensuring the basic rights of all human beings. For example, which traits allowed women-led nations to cope well with COVID-19? Likewise, how can improving racial/ethnic balance in leadership better ensure basic human rights? Leadership is appropriately and ethically represented across gender and race when the ratio of those in leading roles are proportionate to those being led.

Bright Spots in closing gender and racial gaps

In 2018, Glassdoor partnered with JUST Capital to look at major corporations committed to equal pay. Remarkably, only 16 out of 920 publicly traded companies, the likes of Microsoft, VMWare, and Salesforce–just to name a few–were ensuring pay equity across gender and racial and ethnic lines. As companies close gender and racial/ethnic gaps and governments ensure human rights for all citizens, effective leadership promotes values that are transparent, ethical, equitable, sustainable, and inclusive.

Effective leadership entails environmental stewardship

The Internet of things (IoT) entails everything connected to the internet. So too are we interconnected with all living things (IoLT). When nature is out of balance so are we. We are an integral part of nature. We cannot survive without a healthy and diverse environment. As such, it is our human responsibility to care for our use of it. Environmental stewardship refers to responsible use and protection of the natural environment through conservation and sustainable practices. Aldo Leopold (1887–1949) championed environmental stewardship based on a land ethic “dealing with man’s relation to land and to the animals and plants which grow upon it.” (source: Wikipedia)

Effective leadership is intergenerational

Leadership roles in traditional organizations are often held by those who are one, two, or even three generations older than those being led. This alone is not a problem. Actually, there is a wealth of potential here. It can become an issue, however, when senior leadership is unable to incorporate the values and intentions of the younger generations of those they lead. Intergenerational learning is paramount in mutually acknowledging and integrating old and new forms of leadership. Companies who can do so will become more resilient and have an easier time ensuring an organization’s vitality. How can organizations with older forms of leadership give space for newer forms of leadership?

Acknowledging a changing of guards

Each generation has a new ideal of what effective leadership entails. Young people feel unheard and are quick to dismiss older mentalities as antiquated. Older people hold on to long-held beliefs are quick to dismiss newer realities as not being time-tested. A lack of mutual acknowledgment and respect prevents a seamless integration or transition of leadership styles. When all generations can honor the wisdom each brings, then there is an opportunity for dialogue, transformation, and growth. Newer companies and start-ups have an easier time implementing newer forms of leadership and organizational management since most employees belong to one or at most two generations. How can newer forms of leadership be given space in older and larger organizations where three or four generations are working together? As with all changing of the guards, the process must be honorable, on-going, and inclusive.

About the author

Jean-Pierre Kallanian is a Human Systems & Group Dynamics Expert, Conflict Facilitator, Youth Coach, Author, and Speaker. He accompanies individuals and teams wanting to fully integrate their human resource potential at all organizational levels. As the creator of the EPIC Model, Jean-Pierre brings out the expertise in groups by encouraging authenticity, intention, and collective wisdom.

Edge Computing Inspires Human Edge Cultures

edge computing
Image by Sasin Tipchai from Pixabay

Edge computing acquires accurate data quickly

Edge computing consists of IoT devices gathering data closer to the edge of the network. The advantage here is two-fold. First, the accuracy and quality of the data improve the closer it is collected to the source. Second, data is processed more quickly as it need not be transmitted to a central hub for processing. According to an edge computing article by Brandon Butler, doing computing closer to the edge of the network streamlines the flow of traffic from IoT devices, allowing organizations to analyze important data in near real-time.

Scientia Potentia est!

Knowledge is power. Edge computing like digitalization is about increasing the speed of data attainment and processing, i.e.,  knowledge acquisition. The strategy is quite simple. Gather relevant information as quickly as possible to expedite the response to fluctuating markets and shifting customer needs. Efficiently responding to changing market and client needs is valuable. The ability to foresee changes and already have systems, services, and products at the ready is priceless. Market prediction is the difference between industry leaders and followers.

The human obsession with speed

I attended an inspiring impulse talk on edge computing by Igor Grdic, Country Manager, Central Southern Europe, Vertiv. In his presentation, Grdic mentioned the basic physics equation: Time = Distance / Speed.  In the physical world, distance cannot be shortened. Physics proves that if you want to decrease time, increase speed. In western culture, speed is often praised and rewarded. “Time is money!” “Can’t waste time!” Humans know this formula solution all too well.  Late for a meeting? Drive more quickly. Need a coffee fix? Go through the drive-through instead of parking and going inside. I am guilty too. Even as a barefoot runner, I too want to reduce my time by becoming faster.

Human efficiency = Shortening the human distance

Need something from another department and don’t know anybody who works there? After filling out a few forms and sending multiple emails, you may get what you need in a few days or weeks. Know someone who works in that department? Within a day or even hours, you will have what you need. Efficiency between humans is not about increasing speed. It is about shortening the human distance. Digitalization is revolutionizing the way we conceptualize the equation: Time = Distance / Speed. And it is about time! Edge computing shows us that by shortening the distance at which data has to travel, more information can be acquired, processed, and utilized. More importantly, information gathered at the edge is more reliable and relevant. Edge computing decentralizes processes.

What can leaders learn from edge computing?

Companies outfitted with the latest in technology and utilizing edge technology will become more efficient to a certain extent. As the access to technology becomes more accessible, processes used to improve human relationships between co-workers and customers or players in your supply chain will become the game-changer in competitive markets. Trust and relationships improve the quality and transfer of knowledge and goods. The closer information is to the source, the more reliable and valid it is. Vital information is usually known by those at the edge of your organization and by those within your supply chain. Employees and partners at the edge are close to the pulse of how your materials, products and/or services are utilized and valued. They are most knowledgable about what works and what doesn’t. How valuable is their knowledge?

The human/time paradox

Increasing the speed at which people work together results when the social and psychological distance between them is shortened and not by extending work hours and shortening deadlines. Using the right processes can shorten this time. All things digital being equal, the socially and psychologically connected team/supply chain will outperform those that are not. The former is more flexible, adaptable, resilient, engaged, and innovative.  Highly bureaucratic and rigid hierarchical organizational structures and “one-up” work environments harbor jealousy, deceit, and undermining behaviors such as the withholding of information and dehumanizing rumors. All negatively impact efficiency. To increase speed, how much time and money do companies invest in technology in comparison to shortening the distance between employees and partners?

Leaders need to go within in order to go to the edge

Competitive companies and industry forerunners create and foster workplace cultures that trust and rely on those employees and partners living at the edge. What does it take for an organization to capitalize on the wealth of information at the edge? Creating a human edge funnel requires a culture of trust, transparency, collaboration, empowerment, and freedom just to name a few. Leaders best able to let their companies thrive and innovate at the edge require a solid sense of self and a clear and realizable vision that all employees, regardless of position or seniority can manifest and evolve. Hence another paradox. Leaders with the most inner security and certainty can more easily allow and foster a culture that thrives and grows on the outer edges.

About the Author

Jean-Pierre is a Human Systems Expert, Executive Coach, Youth Specialist, and Speaker. He optimizes employee engagement and leadership potential by counseling leaders and enhancing group dynamics. He is the creator of the youth inspired EPIC Model of development and the author of What You Can Learn from Your Teenager: Lessons in Parenting and Personal Growth.

Intergenerational learning ensures viability & innovation

Intergenerational Learning
Intergenerational learning is optimized when all generations are acknowledged and valued for their contributions.

Intergenerational learning is a top priority

Intergenerational learning is needed more now than ever before. Labor markets are struggling to meet rising human resource demands and simultaneously remain innovative. In a blog titled, Leveraging Europe’s Ageing Workforce, the author reports on how a declining pool of potential EU workers in a growing job market is resulting in the frenetic search for qualified and engaged young workers. In the US, the economic situation does not fair better.

A perfect storm is brewing. The combination of a decreasing labor force participation rate, baby boomers retiring, an expanding wage gap between high school and college graduates, and the skyrocketing costs of higher education are well documented. This harsh reality is set against the backdrop of a spiraling national debt that has surpassed $21,000,000,000,000. Let us not forget the ominous and bitter consequences of the 2008 global financial crisis. A corrective course of action is needed to avert a similar or worse fate.

What can we learn from older generations?

Companies need older workers! That is potentially good news for older workers seeking employment, as long as employers see the value in hiring them. By 2024, one in four U.S. workers will be 55 or older, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. How should older workers be regarded in a digital age? How can the labor market incorporate their experience and wisdom? Older employees are typically seen as expensive and replaceable by younger and less expensive counterparts. But is this entirely true? 

Older employees have established networks. They have experience overcoming organizational challenges and achieving lofty goals. Their know-how and connections optimally position them to offer guidance and support. Their trained soft skills can help younger colleagues refine theirs. By sharing their stories and listening to younger generations, senior employees are a source of inspiration. Solely viewing them as a financial burden is not only short-sighted but also detrimental to an organization’s future in today’s market. Regarding them as a vital asset inspires new purpose and fresh meaning in their work-life, boosting their morale and productivity.

What can we learn from younger generations?

“Age shows wisdom, but wisdom shows no age” – Unknown author

As digital natives, young employees today may lack work experience and social competencies, but their ability to navigate in a digital world is unprecedented. In my parenting book What You Can Learn from Your Teenager: Lessons in Parenting and Personal Growth, I outline the EPIC Model, a learning framework embodied by those most adept at learning: young people. The Model consists of four components: exploration, play, inspiration, and connection. Using this framework optimizes intergenerational learning.

Regardless of age, we all have the capacity to learn. Young people can help older ones reignite the innate ability to explore, play, inspire, and connect. Subscribing to such a philosophy allows one to remain open to new possibilities. Organizations adopting such a philosophy remain viable and innovative. Creating an open learning culture improves both employee and organizational performance.

Generational labels impede intergenerational learning

Once GenX, GenY, and GenZ are mentioned, a debate ensues to determine the beginning and end years of each. As if a birth year reveals everything you need to know about a person. A heated discussion then follows to agree upon several descriptors applicable to hundreds of millions of people. Anyone who can memorize some random dates and a few adjectives becomes an immediate generation expert. If it were only so simple!

Labeling people usually leads to stereotypes. Stereotypes usually lead to some form of discrimination. Here are some warning signs of age discrimination. How does this domino effect ameliorate an aging and shrinking workforce? It doesn’t. It does the opposite. It perpetuates the current situation. What happens when organizations place more emphasis on reciprocal intergenerational learning?  How would intergenerational learning impact workplace culture, productivity, and creativity in your organization?

Intergenerational learning in action

Intergenerational learning requires commitment and time. Who has time for that? Time taken now to create new possibilities, improve collaboration, and ignite productivity saves time in the long-run. Processes, where information and conversations that matter most can be discussed from all perspectives, are vital. When all stakeholders participate then all members can take ownership and responsibility for the outcome. 

For technical learning, apprenticeship programs and continuous training keep all stakeholders up-to-date with current trends. Mentoring and reverse mentoring also help young employees with onboarding. Storytelling or various circle methods can be extremely helpful in creating space for reciprocal know-how sharing and open feedback.  Excursions and celebrations build social bonds and create a sense of achievement and belonging. A neutral facilitator may also be preferable when starting out or dealing with more serious issues.  There are numerous ways organizations can fully embrace the benefits of intergenerational learning other than simply creating multigenerational teams and hoping for the best.

About the author

Jean-Pierre is a Process Facilitator, Human Systems Expert, and Youth Specialist. He is the author of “What You Can Learn from Your Teenager: Lessons in Parenting and Personal Growth”. Jean-Pierre accompanies organizations in fully integrating their human resource potential by facilitating group processes that foster authenticity, intention, and collective wisdom. All stakeholders benefit in a culture that supports exploration, play, inspiration, and connection.

Youth leadership cannot wait until the future. It is needed today.

“We realize the importance of our voices only when we are silenced.” -Malala Jousafzai

Youth Leadership
Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai attends the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 25, 2018. Photo: Markus Schreiber/AP

The right for youth to speak about injustice

On October 9,  2012, at the age of 15, Malala Jousafzai and two other girls were riding in a bus when a Taliban hitman came on board. After asking Malala to identify herself or everyone would be shot, she did so. Although making a full recovery, with one bullet she was shot through the head, neck, and shoulder. Malala’s assassination attempt was in retaliation for her activism. Her crime. Malala wanted an education.

What had Malala remained fearful and silent?  What had she not told her story? And what had she not advocated for female rights to an education? Who if not Malala would speak up and act? Six years later and halfway across the world, high school students in Florida would be asking themselves the same question.

On February 14, 2018, 17 students and faculty of Parkland High School were maliciously gunned down during school hours. This had not been the first mass school shooting in recent US history, but it was the first time students, young people, like Malala, had had enough of condolences and empty promises. Like with previous school shootings, adults with the authority to take action paid mostly lip service to an, unfortunately, more common phenomenon in American society. Enough was enough.

Youth leadership in action

Similar to Malala’s courage to advocate in the face of harm, the Parkland student-led rally in Washington D.C. is a mind-blowing example of how youth leadership can influence current social and political conditions.  In the past, a young social or political activist had hurdles to climb regarding accessibility to media, funding, and networking. Today, it may very well be advantageous to be young and an activist.  Through the use of social media, the media, a GoFundMe account, and with the help of private donations from well-connected sympathizers, Parkland students raised $5.5 Million, of which $1.7 Million was raised in just three days.

As impressive, on March 24th, 2018, a mere five weeks after the devasting Parkland high school shooting, roughly 1.2 Million people marched world-wide for gun control. It was the biggest youth protest since the Vietnam War. Both times young Americans organized to this extent was to protest the senseless deaths of young people from weapons and from policymakers doing very little to advocate for their safety and lives.

What accounted for the swift actions of young people who before Parkland were neither fundraisers, event organizers, nor political and social activists? Led not by lobbyists and special interests this youth leadership operated on intention, social media savvy, networking, and everything fundamentally meant to be human. The clarity and precision of their actions rivaled anything any political organization or event planner could execute.

The role basic needs play in mobilizing youth leadership

Regardless of the system (family, organization, or community), harmful patterns can repeat themselves until the system collapses or the cycle is broken. Subsequent reoccurrences can increase in intensity until one of two things occurs. Either one accepts the dysfunction as normal or one takes a stand to change it. Malala and students at Parkland High School both chose the later.

All behavior is for the sake of fulfilling at least one of the basic needs (Survival, Belonging, Freedom, Fun, and Power). The more needs being fulfilled through a behavior, the more significant that behavior becomes. One basic need that mobilizes action regardless of age, gender, race, or religion, is the need for survival. Fight or flight. Sadly, the threat to safety and security in schools is a palatable one felt by too many communities across the United States. In addition to survival, the needs for power (feeling worthwhile to self and others), belonging, freedom, and fun were also jeopardized by the shootings. The response from Parkland High School students (see picture below) is a clear example of how the threat to all five basic needs, mobilized young people to take swift and historic action.

Organizers of the March For Our Lives fulfilled the need for power, satiating a strong desire to not remain a victim. They took meaningful action to improve not only their community but the nation as a whole. The need to belong to a group i.e., the school, was triggered by the shootings. Their community came under attack and the need to protect it and those of students across the US  gave clear purpose for the organizers. Like Malala, students everywhere want to have the freedom to an education and have fun in the process without having to worry about losing their lives.

What can we learn from youth leadership today?

Young people are more informed and engaged than any other previous generation.  When students no longer feel safe in school and adults are seen as doing too little to significantly address the most basic of basic needs, is it really a surprise to see articulate, well-intended, and technologically savvy young people taking matters into their own hands?  As a result, they are shaping public opinion through their response to events. This trend will likely continue.

The deleterious impact of social, corporate, political, and environmental irresponsibility currently transpiring is not a future young people desire. Why wait to do something about it? Young people, with the help of technology and social media, have leveled the playing field in their ability to take action, speak up, organize, and most importantly influence social, political, and environmental change. Young people are more transparent, capturing events in picture or video and broadcasting them globally through social media.

Youth leadership skills are currently needed. Young people are listening, showing empathy, and actively responding to injustices and policies affecting them and their future. Authoritative and dictatorial leadership caters to self-interest and special interest rather than to the common good. Forms of leadership embraced by young people place emphasis on purpose, authenticity, community, and the environment. They are replacing the idiom ‘the end justifies the means’ with ‘the means need to justify the end.’

Youth Leadership
Jacqueline Coren, Emma Gonzalez, Cameron Kasky, David Hogg, and Alex Wind. Photo: YouTube / Face The Nation

About the author

Jean-Pierre Kallanian is a Process Facilitator and Human Systems Expert. He accompanies organizations in fully integrating their human resource potential by facilitating group processes that foster authenticity, intention, and collective wisdom. He is also the author of What You Can Learn from Your Teenager: Lessons in Parenting and Personal Growth.

Why are teens drawn to ISIS?

How the public perceives teens after having joined ISIS gives invaluable clues as to why they may have joined in the first place.

The media and the world are asking why teens of the western world would leave their cozy homes to join the ranks of ISIS and aid them. This phenomenon is occurring in numerous westernized countries: United States, Norway, Australia, France, and Austria. I am examining the case of two female teens from Austria, Samra (left) and Sabina (right), who both left Austria in April 2014 to join ISIS.

Samra and Sabina both left Austria in April 2014 to join ISIS

According to media sources, Samra and Sabina are children of Bosnian immigrants raised in Vienna. Stories of teens fleeing westernized countries to assist ISIS are mainly immigrants or children of immigrant families of Muslim faith. Some also convert to Islam prior to going. Considering the extensive and prolonged war between US-led coalitions and the Middle East, how accepted and integrated are youth and families of Muslim faith living as expats, refugees, and asylees in westernizing countries?

Having worked with teens in conflict with the law for more than a decade, I am naturally drawn to media attention given to teens. Unfortunately, the press teens receive is usually negative, perpetuating harmful teen stereotypes. Here is yet another example of how public criticism on teens choosing to aid ISIS further alienates marginalized youth.

Articles on teens joining ISIS had little insight into my first question. I then became curious about the comments readers were making about teens joining ISIS and particularly about Samra and Sabina. Would the comments be of concern and understanding or hatred and retribution? To my dismay, I was saddened, shocked, and even disturbed by what I read. Some words and expressions are explicit and I apologize, however, I wanted you to read what could be the underlying issue at hand.

Samra and Sabina were described as “weak minded, creatures, dim-witted, unsophisticated, stupid little girls, stupid cows, little Evil/nasty bitches, and dirty little whores”. One female commentator went as far as calling them a “stupid pair of TWATS and brain dead whores.” Another commentator hoped “they returned to Austria in body bags”, while another posted, “kill them and their offspring.” Some blamed the parents and even wanted them prosecuted for aiding terrorists. The hatred in these comments was palpable.

After reading about a hundred or so such comments, I began to feel disenchanted until I saw this post that confirmed my belief about the first question and reconfirmed my sanity and belief in humankind.

“What was happening in their lives before they left their homes? How could they have become so disenchanted with their lives at such a young age, that leaving all and everyone they know was seen as a better life? Questions must be raised at how no one noticed such a change in them. Was there no one talking or taking notice of them. It seems that the only time they felt special to anyone was when fed the ISIS way of thoughts. How very sad for society today. There are probably many young people who are easy meat ready to be converted with empty promises because they have nothing else in their lives to live for.”

This reader was able—with compassion and care— to see root causes of their decisions and trying to take ownership, versus being a detached judge, angry jury, and at times stone-cold executioner. She was looking for a proactive social answer, not a reactive and punitive one. She raises several pertinent questions and the question I had was:  Were these girls and other teens who joined ISIS already disenchanted beforehand, feeling the same and being treated the same as the comments made about them after they joined ISIS? Before engaging with ISIS who was:

Reaching out to them?

Talking to them?

Noticing them?

Making them feel like they belonged?

Making them feel valued and worthy?

Only others (i.e. family, peers, neighborhoods, communities, schools, agencies, and businesses) can answer these fundamental questions. Was society’s response sufficient enough in addressing these existential needs? That is uncertain, however, ISIS was there to fill this void for them.

Extreme groups take advantage of those who feel extremely unaccepted, unloved, and misunderstood because they are desperately seeking extreme ways to satisfy prolonged unmet basic needs. The basic needs of belonging and power (feeling worthwhile to self and others) are very much present in adolescents. If teens cannot find socially responsible outlets to have their basic needs met, then they are vulnerable to extreme and radical groups. ISIS is not the only radical group out there looking for people who are desperately finding a place and purpose.

This happened regularly with the young men I worked with who were either gang involved or seeking gang involvement. They looked to these groups to belong, to feel loved, and purposeful. Some did it for survival (selling drugs and stealing). Many were minorities, immigrants, or children of immigrants living in less than desirable neighborhoods.

Being a “somebody” regardless of how it manifests, is far more desirable than being a “nobody”. Similarly, negative attention is better than no attention. Being neglected, dehumanized, discriminated against, and degraded is severely damaging to one’s sense of self and can have equally damaging repercussions, which brings us back to the public’s comments about Samra and Sabina.

Presuming both are alive and reasonably well (there are rumors of one being dead), how do these comments help marginalized teens— who only later see the gravity of their decision—feel included, wanted, and purposeful? They don’t.

Social workers and Austrian Muslims have joined together to “dereadicalize” young people who have been to Syria, or having thoughts of fighting with ISIS. The goal is to connect them and their families with community agencies and resources to discourage them from extremism. You can read more at www.thelocal.at.

This is a good first step, however, the real impact in helping teens like Samra and Sabina starts with us. What kind of daily interactions are marginalized youth having with you, neighbors, teachers, law enforcement, passersby, peers, and store clerks? Are we, as a community, adequately addressing the 5 questions above, or are we passively and actively inviting and letting extremists do so?

We blame ISIS or other radical and harmful groups consisting of hundreds and even thousands of brainwashing youth, but when a young person decides to join the ranks of any anti-social group we are quick to punish the individual—even the parents—but no one else. If a community of extremists can be blamed for taking advantage of impressionable and alienated youth, why are the communities from which these young people come also not blamed in part for creating an environment that pushes them to seek out, engage with, and ultimately join radical groups?
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Basic Needs Drive Teen Behavior

Teens satisfying basic needs
Image courtesy of Taliesin / morguefile.com

Teens behave to satisfy their basic needs—just like we all do.

If teens are doing what everyone else does, why are their behaviors judged and scrutinized? Four out of five basic needs are being met with this group of teens rafting (the behavior). The five basic needs are:

Survival: food, clothing, shelter, and overall safety

Belonging: being part of a group and having an identity greater than oneself

Power: having self-worth and feeling worthwhile to others

Freedom: having the liberty to live as you want while respecting common laws and the rights of others

Fun: being able to enjoy the pleasures of life

Look at the picture. Clearly the group is having fun. All other needs, except survival, are being met too. The more an activity satisfies other basic needs, the more significant that activity becomes. The young people feel a sense of freedom as they carelessly and playfully float. Since they are in a group, they belong to the rafting activity. One cannot tell how long they have known each other. They could be long-term friends or could be part of a summer youth camp and have only known each other for several days.. As individuals in a group, having purpose and meaning, the need for power is being fulfilled as well. In sum, 4 of the 5 basic needs are being met, making the activity rather important.

What is typically bothersome to adults is not that teenagers are trying to satisfy their basic needs. Rather, what adults have issues with is how teens go about satisfying those needs by scrutinizing the details. Is there anything worth complaining about in the picture? No. Imagine four highly excited young people now coming out of the water. Maybe they are laughing loudly, joking,  swearing, kicking up sand as they walk by, and dripping water on blankets as the rafts pass over sunbathers.

Here are some possible thoughts or responses.
“Teenagers are inconsiderate.”

“Teenagers are rude.”

Teenagers are obnoxious.”

Everything they had been doing to satisfy their basic needs is now forgotten and reduced to a five-second interaction and judgment. Could the teens have been quieter, respected the personal space of others, or apologized had sand or water fallen on blankets? Yes. Maybe then their complete behavior would have been more appreciated and less scrutinized.

Teens, like adults, behave to satisfy their basic needs. Keep that in mind when you are momentarily bothered by what a teen does.

Adults don’t always do it right from start to finish either. Parents behave in ways that bother teens too! Teens have the courage to go all the way and push their limits, whereas adults may hold back, shortchanging the experience and the benefits they could have reaped had they tested their boundaries a bit more.

If the teens had bothered some sunbathers, it most likely wasn’t their intent. They were most likely so wrapped up in what they were doing that they were unaware of anything or anyone else outside the scope of their activity. Don’t be so quick to judge. Adults and parents could benefit by copying how teenagers satisfy their basic needs with passion and intent.

For information on my parenting and self help book “What You Can Learn From Your Teenager: Lessons in Parenting and Personal Growth” please visit: http://www.whatyoucanlearn.com

Conflict Resolution — A fresh look

Approach conflict resolution like you would crossing a river
Image courtesy of Yodod / flickr.com

Why do you encounter the same conflict over and over? Probably because you are using the same strategy you have been using many times before. Conflict resolution is not achieved because for you it is. Conflict resolution works best when those involved can identify the particulars that make this situation different from the last.

Successful problem solving requires you to look at all situations with a fresh perspective no matter how similar they look. The hiker above may have crossed the stream from the same point a hundred times, but he has never crossed it the same way twice. Why?

Water flow and levels are in constant flux due to rainfall. Water temperature varies with the weather. The stones on which the hiker steps on are weathered or not in the same place. These are but a few of the changes that exist each time the hiker crosses the stream even if it is at the same point.

It is futile to imagine crossing the river in exactly the same manner. Similarly, there is no point in looking at the same student, child, or employee sitting before you in the same regard as the last time you were in a conflict resolution situation with them. No matter how familiar a conflict feels, there is always something different about it.

What is different this time? How can this difference play a key role in resolving the issue? How can you get those involved in the conflict — possibly you — to see how these key nuances could get you to a resolution, just like the hiker has to roll up his pant leg higher because the water level is a bit higher than the last time he crossed due to the excessive rainfall the day before.

For more tips check out Conflict Resolution Strategies

Changing Your Focus Creates New Possibilities

Screen Shot 2014-05-07 at 12.01.36 PMIt is not what we look at that bothers us, rather it is what we choose to focus on. The young woman has an object of interest in her sights and is now focusing more closely on a particular aspect of the subject. What she focuses on will determine the outcome of the impression she makes. Another photographer may focus on another part of the subject giving it a new perspective and new meaning.

The Greek Stoic philosopher Epictetus stated that people are not disturbed by things but by the view they have of them. So is the case when leaders are confronted with organizational issues with subordinates or when a parent is working out a problem with a child. Contention arises when we neither make an attempt to focus on mutual interests nor seek to understand other perspectives.

When this occurs with organizations that service young people or in the parent/child case, the young people feel the brunt of the stalemate or battle. In the former, a worker’s strike or contemptuous attitude to spite administration or workers could adversely impact services causing quality to diminish. An organization’s mission could be compromised. In the latter case, a parent may use punishment or restrictions until the child concedes or the child may become defiant and obstinate if needs are not heard or met.

Those effective at problem-solving have a knack for looking at something from all perspectives, broadening his or her level of understanding, therefore allowing greater possibilities to find a resolution where all parties are satisfied. My upcoming book, What You Can Learn From Your Teenager: Lessons in Parenting and Personal Growth, offers parents the possibility to minimize these setbacks and negative impact on the parent/child relationship by changing how they look at their teenager. The book gives parents an opportunity to focus on all aspects of their adolescent, resulting in a more balanced and healthy relationship. And as a bonus, the parent may even learn something about themselves in the process.